Night Wizard!:Combat Rules

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Square Battle Rules

Confronting the Emulators... That is the true climax of Night Wizard. There is a method to confront foul enemies on an appropriate stage. This method is the Square Battle Rules.

Contents

Tactical Combat

The PCs in NW2- that is, the Night Wizards- oppose their enemies for a principle reason. That is in order to protect the world from its enemies and recover that which is stolen. Only those with power can perform this glorious deed.

Squares

Battles in NW2 take place in squares, like chess or shogi, drawn atop the Battle Management Sheet. These are known as 'Sq' for short. Squares are the basic units used to represent the range of movement, weaponry and magic. Atop these Squares, the characters' position in relation to the enemies and their ability to move and attack can be visualized. A Square is defined as that space which os occupied by a single character. In other words, a Square represents the position of a character. /chk The size of a Square is not defined. This can be decided by the GM as best suits the situation. If an estimate is necessary, one can consider them to be squares 5 meters in each direction.

Vision/Line of Sight

When making an attack with weapons or magic, it is necessary for the enemy to be within sight. Whether attacking an enemy in a neighboring Square with a sword, or sniping with a firearm, one must confirm that the enemy is visible. Draw a line between the center point of the square in which the character making the attack is located, and the center point of the square in which the target is located. If this line is interrupted by a wall, pillar or other obstruction, the enemy is not within sight. For short, this is known as 'line of sight.' Which obstacles interrupt visibility should be decided by the GM, taking the present situation into account.

Rounds

A battle begins with the Round Progression. Rounds are the term applied to units of time within the game. In these Rounds, every character participating in the battle will perform actions at this point in time, until it has been decided that the Round is over. The time span of a single Round is not defined. This can be decided by the GM as best suits the situation. If an estimate is necessary, one can consider them to last one minute each. Of course, longer rounds are possible, as are shorter ones. For short, Rounds are abbreviated as R.

Processes

Rounds are divided into four Processes. It is through the repetition of these four Processes that Round Progression occurs. The steps themselves are called Round Progression. In a typical Round Progression, the GM may wish to limit the number of Actions that can take place, or impose a strict order of Actions. /chk Each Process will now be described.

  • Setup Process

At the beginning of a Round is the Setup Process. During the Setup Process, all characters must determine their Action Count. The order of Actions is also determined at this point.

  • Initiative Process

The GM should select the character with the highest Action Count at present. This character is known as the Initiative Character. When no character has an Action Count above zero, and thus no character can begin their Main Process, the Clean-Up Process should begin.

  • Main Process

The Initiative Character will now enter their Main Process. Entering a Main Process causes Action Count to decrease by 10. If Action Count falls below 0, that character will not act thereafter during the Round and cannot become the Initiative Character. Afterwards, the GM should return to the Initiative Process and select the new Initiative Character.

  • Clean-Up Process

Finally, the GM will declare the Clean-Up Process. When this has concluded, the round is over. If Round Progression is not complete, the GM may declare the start of a new Round and enter the Setup Process.

Enemy Mortality Judges

Performing Mortality Judges for enemies is optional.

Ending Round Progression

The GM may declare Round Progression to be complete at any time. For instance, if all the enemies have been defeated or else fled, even if it is the middle of the round, there is nothing more to be done except the Clean-Up Process. The GM should ask any characters who have Action Count remaining whether they wish to perform a final Main Process.

Determining the Order of Actions

Characters may choose to appear newly in a scene during the Setup Process. However, they must perform an Appearance Judge.

Action Judges

Action Judges should be performed by all PCs and NPCs to determine the order of Actions. This is a good opportunity for Players to spend Prana. If the GM wishes, all rolls may be made at the same time. In this case, any Players who wish to use Prana should make their roll separately afterwards. /chk

The Battle Management Sheet

At the beginning of Round Progression, the GM should prepare the Battle Management Sheet and all markers and counters. The Battle Management Sheet can be found on the reverse side of the cover. It should be spread on the table. Lines in a grid pattern divide the Battle Management Sheet into boxes, each representing one Square. During Round Progression, the GM should represent the situation on the tiles of the Battle Management Sheet. A marker should be chosen to represent each character and enemy. Objects may be represented with markers as well.

Action Count Gauge

This allows the participating characters to track their Action Count. Each Main Process consumes 10 Action Count. If Action Count falls below zero, "Exhaustion" occurs and the character can no longer enter the Main Process until the end of the round.

All-Out Movement Chart

A chart which explains All-Out Movement.

Floor

The floor on which the battle takes place. Each square outlined by the black divider lines represents 1 Square. The cross at the center allows Lines of Sight to be measured.

Counter Setup

Next, the GM should place counters in the Action Gauge area to represent each character's Action Count. In order to make distinguishing between counters easy, it is suggested to match the colors of counters to the markers representing each character. After this is done, the Setup Process of the first Round can begin.

Action Count

Action Count is a number that represents the amount of actions each character can move in a single Round. A large number indicates a character able to take swift action. This may give you an advantage against the front line of enemies.

Determining Action Count

During the Setup Process, each character should perform an Action Judge* and note the Achievement Value. This Achievement Value will become their Action Count for the round. However, Criticals or Fumbles cannot be rolled. If a Critical or Fumble Number is rolled, the result of the dice should be treated simply as a number. This ensures that all characters will begin battle with an action count higher than 1.

Exhaustion

After a character concludes their Main Process, their Action Count decreases by 10. If this causes the Action Count to drop below 0, they can no longer enter a Main Process during this round. This state is known as Exhaustion. Conversely, so long as Action Count is above 1, the Main Process can be entered. For instance, if Action Count is 34 at the start of battle, after the next Action it will be 24. After the next 14, and after the next 4. When Action Count is 4, at the end of the Main Process, that character's Action Count will decrease by 10 to -6 and Exhaustion will occur. When all characters participating in a Round enter Exhaustion, the Clean-Up Process should begin and the Round should shortly end.

Round Progression

Steps of the Setup Process

The steps of the Setup Process are listed below.

Any characters who have not yet appeared may appear during the Setup Process. They should perform an Appearance Judge*.

Appearance Judge

It's also okay not to perform Appearance Judges at the time of battle. Decide freely which characters will appear in the Scene.

Opening Lunar Robes

Wizards possess a Lunar Robe from which they may retrieve equipment. Now is a good time to change your equipment. However, a character that opens their Lunar Robe may not use Special Abilities s or Items during the Setup Process.

Using Special Abilities and Items

The GM may allow PCs to use Special Abilities, Magic or Items during the Setup Process. Once the enemies have also used any Special Abilities, Magic or Items, the players should decide their Action Counts. If two players have the same Action Count, they should decide among themselves who goes first. For NPCs, it is the GM's decision.


Determining Action Count

As mentioned previously, an Action Judge (with no Criticals or Fumbles) should be performed by all characters to determine the Action Count.

Steps of the Initiative Process

The GM should next select the character with the highest Action Count as the Initiative Character. After all characters have entered Exhaustion, the Cleanup Process should begin. Some Special Abilities, Items and Magic take effect during the Initiative Process. Handle this in the same manner as the Setup Process.

When Action Counts are Tied

In the event that multiple characters have the same Action Count, first, allow the PCs to take priority. If multiple PCs have the same Action Count, the affected Players may decide among themselves which character will act first. For NPCs, it is the GM's decision which acts first. After all PCs with a given count have completed their Main Process, the GM may allow NPCs to act.

Delaying Actions

A character may wish to intentionally delay their own actions. During the Initiative Process, the Initiative Character may ask to lower their Action Count. They may also choose to skip their Main Process, if they do not want their Action Count to be lowered by an additional 10. /chk However, if Action Count falls below 0, Exhaustion will still occur. In other words, it is possible to 'sit out' the rest of the round.

Main Process

The Initiative Character may begin their Main Process. The Main Process is always begun by the designated Initiative Character, In this process, the Initiative Character may take Actions. Even if the Initiative Character expend Action Count to use Magic, Special Abilities, etc. during their Main Process, their status as Initiative Character will not change. Until the end of the Main Process, the Initiative Character may act freely.

Actions

During round progression, there are four broad categories of Actions a character may perform. These are Minor Actions, Major Actions, Reactions, and Auto Actions.

Minor Actions

A Minor Action is typically preparation for a Major Action. Thus, it is often performed prior to the Major Action. Minor Actions do not cause Action Count to decrease. Below are listed some basic Minor Actions.

  • Normal Movement
  • Retrieving an ordinary item or piece of equipment from a Lunar Robe, putting one back in, or wearing equipment
  • Activating or removing an Enchantment
  • You may choose a new Enchantment within your Enchantment Level Limit* and Magical Memory Capacity from Enchantments in your possession. /chk
  • Magic or Special Abilities with "Timing: Minor Action"
  • Using equipment designated as Minor Actions
  • Using items designated as Minor Actions
  • Picking up an item at one's feet
  • Anything else the GM designates as a Minor Action
Major Actions

The Major Action is the primary action during the Main Process. These typically require a Judge and may necessitate other characters to make Judges as well. Below are listed some basic Major Actions.

  • Normal Movement
  • All-Out Movement
  • Physical Attacks
  • Magic Attacks
  • Changing a memorized Magic spell

Choose a spell from among your acquired Magic to memorize. Within your Magical Memory Capacity, you may choose any spell (that you possess.)

  • Magic or Special Abilities with "Timing: Major Action"
  • Using equipment designated as Major Actions
  • Using items designated as Major Actions
  • Anything else the GM designates as a Major Action
Paying for Magic, Special Abilities, etc.

Many magic spells and Special Abilities require a cost paid from Action Count. As mentioned before, even if one's Action Count decreases during the Main Process, the Initiative Character will not change. There are some costs that instead inflict Bad Statuses. If a Bad Status is inflicted, it takes effect after the Major Action is complete.

Reactions

A Reaction is an action performed to hinder or deal with other actions. For instance, dodging or defending against an attack is a Reaction. There are additional rules that apply to Reactions. Reactions do not decrease Action Count. In addition, they can be performed even during Exhaustion. Below are listed some basic Reactions.


  • Defending against a Physical Attack
  • Defending against a Magic Attack
  • Magic or Special Abilities with "Timing: Reaction"
  • Using equipment designated as Reactions
  • Using items designated as Reactions
  • Anything else the GM designates as a Reaction
Auto Actions

Auto Actions are simple actions that do not fall into the three categories above and can be performed during a Main Process. There are few restrictions to what can be performed as an Auto Action. Auto Actions do not reduce Action Count nor turn count. However, the GM may choose to limit the amount of Auto Actions performed during a single turn. Like Reactions, Auto Actions may be performed during Exhaustion. Of course, this is limited to Auto Actions such as speaking. Which Auto Actions may be performed during Exhaustion is the decision of the GM. Below are listed some basic Auto Actions.

  • Speech, conversation
  • Taking an item out of a Lunar Robe
  • Putting an item in a Lunar Robe
  • Taking equipment out of a Lunar Robe
  • Putting equipment into a Lunar Robe
  • Cancelling an active Enchantment
  • Switching the hand of a weapon or weapons
  • Magic or Special Abilities with "Timing: Auto Action"
  • Equipment with "Timing: Auto Action"
  • Using items designated as Auto Actions
  • Any other action (that the GM approves as an Auto Action)
Attribute Changes when (De)Activating Enchantments

When one alters active Enchantments, their Combat Attributes and Magic Power will change. This takes place immediately. Magic Power is the basis of one's maximum MP, but does not directly affect their current MP. However, if Magic Power (and MP) decrease, an equal amount of MP is immediately lost from current MP. Changing active Enchantments will never increase or recover MP*.

Ending the Main Process

When the Main Process ends, the Initiative Character's Action Count decreases by 10. If the result is that their Action Count falls below 0, they will enter Exhaustion.

Clean-Up Process

The Clean-Up Process consists of additional tasks that are performed at the end of each Round. For instance, any characters in a Near-Death State must make a Mortality Judge. After this has finished, Round Progression continues as the Setup Process of the next Round begins. Below are listed the steps of the Clean-Up Process.

  • Poison and other Ongoing Damage Effects
  • Recovery from Daze, etc.
  • Items and Special Abilities used during the Clean-Up Process
  • Mortality Judgement

Mortality Judgement

Characters in a Near-Death State (P196) must perform a Mortality Judge during the Clean-Up Process to determine whether they will remain alive. Mortality Judges are explained on Page 187.

Movement

To get close for a physical attack, in range of magic, or else escape from an enemy, it is necessary to move across Squares. There are two methods of Movement- Normal Movement and All-Out Movement.

Normal Movement

Normally, each character may move a number of Squares in any cardinal direction equal to their Movement Power. Moving diagonally to a Square is not possible. Normal Movement is a Minor Action, but can also be a Major Action.

All-Out Movement

There is also a method to move with one's full power. The number of Squares each All-Out Movement can cover is determined by a Judge. Thus, it may cover a large number of Squares, or not many at all. A character who makes an All-Out Movement should perform a Judge based on their Agility. Check the Achievement Value against the All-Out Movement Chart on the Battle Management Sheet to determine the number of Squares that they can move.

Withdrawal

If a character enters the same square as an enemy (or NPC trying to obstruct them, object, trap, etc.) that square requires 2 Squares of Movement Power to withdraw from. For instance, if a character with a Movement Power of 2 chooses to withdraw from an occupied Square, moving to any adjacent Square will complete their Movement. Withdrawing from a Square occupied by friendly characters requires only the normal amount of Movement Power. Additionally, entering a Square in which an enemy is present does not require additional Movement Power. /chk

Flight

Characters may lift off the ground via the use of Magic, Special Abilities, or Items such as brooms; this is known as Flight. A character in Flight may withdraw from Squares in which enemies are present without additional Movement Points. Of course, nothing on the ground presents a problem for them.

Height of Flight

The height of Flight is not defined except when necessary. If an estimate is desired, 1-2 meters should do. Of course, please determine the height as best suits the situation and surrounding Squares. However, take care not to add unnecessary complexity. This should be decided with the consent of all participating.

Vertical Movement

A character in Flight may choose to ascend to a higher Square. Of course, on the board this will just be a change of position within the same Square. It is possible to ascent and descend freely. Flight begins at a height of 0 vertical squares. Within the range of magic, etc. vertical movement is performed much like other movement. Weapon range is also calculated in the same way. For example, in the following chart, relative to the character at (1), (2) is 1 square distant and (3) and (4) are both 4 squares distant.

Flying using Lunar Robes

Using the Lunar Robes which they all possess, Wizards can take flight. Essentually, by altering the shapes of their Lunar Robes, Wizards can veil themselves perfectly in order to fly. Slight adjustments in the shape of their Lunar Robes can change their speed or direction. Of course, this requires skill and practice; some have a talent for it and some do not. In order to achieve this level of fine control, at the beginning of Flight, 1d6 MP must be spent. Treat this as the cost of Empowerment Magic. If one does not have the necessary MP, they cannot take flight. During Round Progression, taking flight is a minor action. 。 Using one's Lunar Robe to fly is not possible within a Fortress. Also, it is taboo to fly in a place where Innocents may observe you. Cameras abound in the present age, with few blind spots. Thus, it is recommended to open a Lunar Casket before taking flight.

Physical Attacks

Attacking a target with a weapon such as a sword or gun that causes physical damage is known as a physical attack. The target of the attack must be within the range of the weapon (or other implement.) The Combat Attributes relevant to a Physical Attack are "Hit", "Dodge", "Attack" and "Defense", used as explained below. First, the character performing as the Physical Attack is known as the Attacker, and the character that is the target of it is known as the Defender. These are equivalent to the Active Party and Passive Party in a Conflict Judge. All judges performed by the Defender are Reactions.

Weapon Range

Weapons with their range listed as "-" can perform Physical Attacks only in close proximity (the same Square.) These cannot attack enemies outside the same Square. See Page 149 for details.

Hit Judgement

In order to determine whether a Physical Attack will hit, a Conflict Judge known as a Hit Judge is performed. The Attacker uses their "Hit" attribute, while the Defender uses their "Dodge" attribute. If the Attacker's Achievement Value exceeds that of the Defender's, the attack has hit. If this happens, continue to the Damage Roll. Otherwise, the Physical Attack is complete.

Hit Judgement Attack Hits: if Attacker's "Hit" + 2d6 >= Defender's "Dodge" + 2d6

Damage Roll

To determine how much damage is inflicted by a Physical Attack, a Damage Roll is performed. If the Defender has a sufficient "Defense", it is possible for no damage at all to be taken. This is a Judge concerning the Attacker's "Attack" and the Defender's "Defense." Subtract the Defender's Achievement Value from that of the Attacker's. This is the amount of Physical Damage taken. Of course, if the amount is 0 or less, no damage is taken.

Damage Roll Physical Damage = (Attacker's "Attack" + 2d6) - (Defender's "Defense" + 2d6)

Applying Damage

Damage should be subtracted from current HP, and this written in the HP column of the Record Sheet. At this time, the effects of Magic, Special Abilities, and Equipment should also take place. However, if the amount of Physical Damage inflicted is below zero, no Physical Damage is inflicted. Any Bad Statuses which accompany the Physical Damage should be applied at this time. However, if no damage was inflicted, these effects will not occur.

New HP = Current HP - Physical Damage

Damage Element

Physical damage possesses an elemental affinity. This is known as the Damage Element. The Damage Element is typically the Attacker's primary Element. However, Special Abilities, Magic and wielded weapons may change the Damage Element to another.

Magic Attacks

When one uses Invocation or Enchantments to inflict damage upon an enemy, this is known as Magic Damage. The target of the attack must be within the range of the magic or Enchantment range (unless specified otherwise.) The Combat Attributes relevant to a Magic Attack are "Magic Hit", "Resistance", "Magic Attack" and "Magic Defense", used as explained below. First, the character performing as the Magic Attack is known as the Attacker, and the character that is the target of it is known as the Defender. These are equivalent to the Active Party and Passive Party in a Conflict Judge. All judges performed by the Defender are Reactions.

Hit Judgement

In order to determine whether a Magic Attack will hit, a Conflict Judge known as a Hit Judge is performed. The Attacker uses their "Magic Hit" attribute, while the Defender uses their "Resistance" attribute. If the Attacker's Achievement Value exceeds that of the Defender's, the attack has hit. If this happens, continue to the Damage Roll. Otherwise, the Magic Attack is complete.

Hit Judgement Attack Hits: if Attacker's "Magic Hit" + 2d6 >= Defender's "Resistance" + 2d6

Damage Roll

Perform a Damage Roll in the same manner as for a Physical Attack. The judge is between the Attacker's "Magic Attack" and the Defender's "Magic Defence." Otherwise, the process is the same.

Damage Roll Physical Damage = (Attacker's "Magic Attack" + 2d6) - (Defender's "Magic Defense" + 2d6)

Applying Damage

Apply damage in the same manner as for a Physical Attack.

New HP = Current HP - Magic Damage

Damage Element

Magic Damage possesses an element. This is known as the Damage Element. The Damage Element is determined by the Magic used.

Magic Damage and Physical Damage

Among Special Abilities and Magic, there may be Physical Attacks that inflict Magic Damage, or vice versa. In this situation, the attribute used by the Defender during the Damage Roll changes. Physical Damage should use the attribute "Defense", and Magic Damage the attribute "Magic Defense."

Effects of Damage

Damage inflicted by attacks or magic upon a character may have various effects.

Minimum Level

Hit Points may decrease below 0 from damage or by paying costs. If HP decreases below zero, that character enters a Near Death state. Additionally, no more costs may be paid with HP when it is below 0. The minimum levels of both MP and Prana are 0. They cannot decrease below zero. Additionally, Bad Statuses cannot cause them to decrease to zero. /chk Neither MP nor Prana can be spent if the expenditure would cause them to fall below zero.

Near-Death States

Damage or other causes may result in a character's HP dropping below zero, causing them to enter a Near-Death State. A character in a Near-Death State can perform no Major Action, Minor Action, Reaction, Auto Action or Judge other than a Mortality Judge. Thus, if they are the target of a Physical or Magic Attack, use the Combat Attribute alone as the Achievement Value. A character in a Near-Death State has an action count of 0 and is considered to have entered Exhaustion. Characters in a Near-Death State may not recover HP through the use of Special Abilities, Magic, Items or any means other than a Mortality Judge.

Recovering from a Near-Death State

During the Clean-Up Process, Special Abilities, Magic or Items that allow a character to recover from a Near-Death State may be used. This causes that character's HP to become 1. At this time, all Bad Statuses are also removed. Alternately, if a successful Mortality Judge is performed during the Clean-Up Process, the character recovers from a Near-Death State.

Mortality Judges

A character in a Near-Death State may make a Mortality Judge during the Clean-Up Process. Mortality Judges are explained on page 187. If the Mortality Judge is successful, the Near-Death State is recovered from. A character that fails a Mortality Judge will die. Performing Mortality Judges for NPCs is optional.

Death

A PC that has died can no longer used to participate in future sessions. However, if the GM consents, characters may pray for their happiness in the next world*.

Happiness in the Next World

There are no rules written for resurrecting the dead. This is left up to the GM. While it is not stated to be something possible or impossible, it should not be as simple as paying a fee. Death is the end of all things- a dramatic fate. Make your rules for resurrecting the dead the groundwork of a new adventure.

Bad Statuses

During battle, Special Abilities, Magic, Items, etc. may inflict negative conditions known as Bad Statuses upon characters. The Bad Statuses are listed below. Any number of Bad Statuses may be in effect at the same time. Bad Statuses may be recovered from by Items, Magic or other means. However, they can be in effect only during battle (the Round Progression.) At the end of the battle, all Bad Statuses are recovered from.

Unconsciousness

Magic or Items may cause a character to fall unconscious. Except for attempting to recover from unconsciousness, an Unconscious character can perform no Major Actions, Minor Actions, Reactions, Auto Actions or other Judges. Thus, if they are the target of a Physical or Magic Attack, use the Combat Attribute alone as the Achievement Value. If a character falls Unconscious, they recover from the Pressure, Daze, and Panic Bad Statuses.

Recovering from Unconsciousness

A character who is Unconscious may make a Difficulty 15 Judge using "Spirit" during their Main Process. If this Judge succeeds, they will recover from unconsciouness. This is a Major Action. Additionally, Special Abilities, Magic or Items may be used to recover from Unconsciousness.

Pressure

Pressure indicates that a character is being crushed by an intangible pressure. A character affected by Pressure cannot declare the use of any Special Abilities*.

Recovering from Pressure requires either a Major or Minor Action.

Panic

Panic indicates that a character has grown flustered and lost their balance. A character affected by Panic cannot perform either All-Out Movement or Normal Movement. Additionally, they suffer a -10 penalty to the Achievement Value of all Reactions.

Recovering from Panic

Recovering from Panic requires either a Major or Minor Action.


Poison

A character may be poisoned by Items or by Special Abilities. Poison will cause a character's HP to decrease during the Clean-Up Process, the amount depending on the level of the poison.

Recovering from Poison

Poison may be recovered from using Items, Magic or Special Abilities.

Capture

Some Special Abilities, Items, or attacks from weapons or Enchantments may bind their opponent. A character who is Captured may not perform Physical or Magic Attacks.

Recovering from Capture requires both a Major and Minor Action. Thus, it equates to skipping a Main Process.

Paralysis

Special Abilities, Enchantments, etc. can cause a character's body to go numb. A character afflicted by Paralysis cannot perform Normal Movement, and the Achievement Value of all Reactions takes a penalty of -5.

Recovering from Paralysis

Paralysis may be recovered from using Items, Magic or Special Abilities.

Daze

Receiving a powerful blow may cause a character to become Dazed. A character who is Dazed receives a penalty of -5 to all Judges.

Recovering from Daze

Recovering from a Daze requires either a Major or Minor Action. Alternately, it may be recovered from during the Clean-Up Process.

Natural HP Recovery

With the GM's permission, a well-rested character may perform a Judge to naturally recover HP. Base this Judge upon the character's Strength. The Achievement Value of the Judge is the amount of HP recovered.

Natural MP Recovery

With the GM's permission, a well-rested character may perform a Judge to naturally recover MP. Base this Judge upon the character's Spirit. The Achievement Value of the Judge is the amount of MP recovered.

Attacking at Range

When targeting multiple Enemies with an attack, the Attacker may perform only a single Judge. However, all Defenders should perform their own opposing Judge.

Cover

A character who is in the same Square as another may choose to defend them from attack. "Cover" should be announced after the Hit Judge has taken place, but before the Damage Roll. The character performing it will substitute themselves for the target in the Damage Roll. They will also receive the damage. When damage is complete, the character who has performed Cover will have their Action Count decreased by 10*.

"Decreased by 10"

A character with an Action Count of 9 can still perform Cover. In this case, the character's Action Count will drop below 0, and they will enter Exhaustion.

Covering Ranged Attacks

A character may choose to take another's damage* as well as their own from an attack by themselves. Have them participate in both Damage Rolls.

Taking Damage Oneself

For example, if the Attacker's Attack Judge has a result of 48, and the Defender performs 2 Defense Judges with a result of 45 and 40, they will take 3 and then 8 damage.